Debugging Microservices in Red Hat OpenShift with Solo Squash

Betty Junod | May 2, 2019

Microservices architecture has provided the ability to ship software more frequently and faster than ever. With lots of independent, loosely coupled services distributed across an environment, debugging issues can be a difficult task.

Red Hat OpenShift® is an enterprise Kubernetes platform that RHEL customers can use to build and operate cloud-native microservices. Our pals Didier Wojciechowski and Madou Coulibaly at Red Hat have put together a workshop showing how to use Red Hat OpenShift, Solo Squash, Open Tracing, Kiali and Istio together to debug applications in a microservices context.

Check out the workshop at these upcoming events:

Workshop: Debugging microservices applications on Red Hat OpenShift

Day & Time: Tuesday, May 7th at 3:45 PM| Learn More

Red Hat Summit is May 7 — May 19 at the Boston Convention Center. Check out this practical hands on workshop to get familiar with common tracing and debugging techniques using Jaeger and OpenTracing, Istio, Kiali, and Squash in a microservices context.

This workshop will cover how to

  • Visualize and monitor a network of microservices using Istio and Kiali.
  • Perform trace analysis using CNCF Jaeger and OpenTracing to identify issues and problems.
  • Execute runtime debugging with Squash across multiple microservices and fix open issues.

OpenShift GENEVA Meetup in GENEVA

Day & Time: May 16 at 5pm | Register Here

Going to be in Geneva, Switzerland area on Thursday May 16th, Didier and Madou will be running the debugging workshop at the meetup along with other great topics on OpenShift, Kafka and DevOps.

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Can’t make it to any of the events listed but still interested in the workshop? The lab repo is here if you feel adventurous in trying out in your own environment or contact us to request a demo.

Learn more about Solo.io and how we can help connect all of your applications to accelerate your journey to cloud native application architecture

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